1. While most penguins are monogamous, they spend most of their year apart.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  2. There are 17 to 20 species of penguins, depending on which scientist you ask.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  3. Some prehistoric penguin species attained enormous sizes, becoming as tall or as heavy as an adult human.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  4. The oldest known fossil penguin species lived in the early Paleocene epoch
    of New Zealand,
    about 62 million years ago.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  5. Penguins can jump up to 6 feet (1.8 m) out of the water.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  6. 1 in 50,000 penguins are born with brown rather than black plumage.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  7. Penguins have an organ near the eye that filters salt from the water out of their system.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  8. In order to discover that penguins sleep more deeply in the afternoon, scientists crept up on sleeping penguins at different times of the day and poked them with a stick until they woke up.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  9. The Emperor Penguin is able to dive to depths of over 500m and stay under water for up to 27 minutes.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  10. Roles are reversed on Emperor Penguin: the Male incubates the egg while she goes out to feed.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  11. Magellanic penguins always return to same mate after solo journeys totalling 200,000 miles.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  12. Scientists can locate colonies of Penguins from space just by looking for dark ice patches of penguin poop.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  13. In 2008, Norway knighted a penguin.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  14. In 2009, snipers were deployed in Australia to protect a colony of little penguins from predators.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  15. There are no penguins
    in the Arctic.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  16. Seals like to have sex with penguins.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  17. Penguins generally only lay one brood. The exception is the little penguin, which can raise two or three broods in a season.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  18. When penguin mothers lose a chick, they sometimes attempt to "steal" another mother's chick.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  19. The most northerly penguins live in the Galapagos Islands.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  20. Penguins are able to control blood flow to their extremities, reducing the amount of blood that gets cold, but still keeping the extremities from freezing.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  21. It is illegal for U.S. citizens to eat penguins.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  22. Most penguins swim underwater at 4 to 7 mph.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  23. Penguins spend about half of their lives on land and half in the oceans.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  24. Penguins don't have teeth. Instead, they have backward-facing fleshy spines that line the inside of their mouths.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  25. Once a year, penguins replace their old feathers by new ones.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  26. The largest living species of Penguins is the Emperor Penguin. They are about 1.1 m (3 ft 7 in) tall and weigh about 35 kg (77 lb).
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  27. Penguins can't taste sweet or savory flavors, only sour and salty ones.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  28. The African penguin is also known as the jackass penguin, due to its donkey-like braying sounds.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
  29. Many species of penguins gift mates with rocks.
    ♦ SOURCE
    ♺ SHARE
Asia
America
Africa
Europe
Oceania
Antarctica
U.S.A.
United Nations
Cities
Places
Historic Events
People & Civilizations
Social Issues
Life & Love
Tech & Invention
Humor & Offbeat
Religion
Books & Language
Movies & TV
Art & Music
Food & Drink
Business & Economy
Sports & Games
Science
Animals & other lifeforms
Body & Health
Space
Global Issues
Phenomena
Plants & Minerals
World
History
Society
Nature
X
share
 
  
FACTSLIDES BOOK
Introducing our first book:

1001 Facts to Make your Brain Explode!

Even if you visit Factslides.com every day to get your dosis of new facts —just like over 1 million visitors do every month—, in this book you'll find facts you've never seen before!
Check it out on Amazon »