1. 111,111,111
    x
    111,111,111
    =
    12,345,678,987,654,321.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  2. If you have a pizza with radius Z and thickness A, its volume is =
    Pi*Z*Z*A
    ♦ SOURCE
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  3. 1089
    x
    9
    =
    9801.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  4. Ancient Babylonians did math in base 60 instead of base 10. That's why we have 60 seconds in a minute and 360 degrees in a circle.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  5. Students who chew gum have better math test scores than those who do not, a study found.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  6. 2,520 is the smallest number that can be exactly divided by all the numbers 1 to 10.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  7. 123 - 45 - 67 + 89 = 100.
    123 + 4 - 5 + 67 - 89 = 100.
    123 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 + 8 - 9 = 100.
    1 + 23 - 4 + 5 + 6 + 78 - 9 = 100.
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  8. There are 177,147 ways to tie a tie, according to mathematicians.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  9. In 1900, all the world's mathematical knowledge could be written in about 80 books; today it would fill more than 100,000 books.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  10. The birthday paradox says that in a group of just 23 people, there's a 50% chance that at least two will have the same birthday.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  11. Multiplying 21978 by 4 reverses the order of the numbers: 87912.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  12. Isaac Newton's Principia Mathematica contained a simple calculation error that went unnoticed for 300 years.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  13. 2200 years ago, Eratosthenes estimated the Earth's circumference using math, without ever leaving Egypt. He was remarkably accurate. Christopher Columbus later studied him.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  14. Mathematician Paul Erdos could calculate in his head, given a person's age, how many seconds they had lived, when he was just 4 years old.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  15. In middle school, 74% of girls express interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, but when choosing a college major, just 0.4% of high school girls select computer science.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  16. The largest prime number ever found is more than 22 million digits long.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  17. Multiplying 21,978 by 4 reverses the order of the numbers to 87,912.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  18. The discoveries of Greek mathematicians such as Pythagoras, Euclid, and Archimedes, are still used in mathematical teaching today.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  19. 1 divided by 998001 gives a complete sequence from 000 to 999 in order.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  20. 2,520 is the smallest number that can be exactly divided by all the numbers 1 to 10.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  21. Arabic numerals, like the ones we use today in English, were actually invented in India.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  22. The Millennium Prize is a US$1 million award given to whoever can solve any 1 of 7 math problems, but to date only 1 of the problems has been solved.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  23. A physicist faced with a fine for running a stop sign in 2012 proved his innocence by publishing a mathematical paper. He even won a prize for his efforts.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  24. 2013 was the first year since 1432 that's a rearrangement of four consecutive numbers.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  25. Philosopher René Descartes is most well known for the saying "I think, therefore I am," but he also developed the XY-coordinate system.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  26. Almost 50% of adults in England can't do basic maths.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  27. In 1900, all the world's mathematical knowledge could be written in about 80 books; today it would fill more than 100,000.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  28. The highest accuracy calculations at NASA use just 15 decimals of Pi.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  29. The most prolific mathematician of the 20th Century, Paul Erdos, used amphetamine to fuel 20-hour number benders.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  30. In many Israeli schools, algebra is taught without the use of the symbol "+" as it looks like a Christian cross. They use an inverted "T" instead.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  31. Taking Pi to 39 digits allows you to measure the circumference of the observable universe to within the width of a single hydrogen atom.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  32. The word ‘hundred' derives from ‘hundra' in Old Norse, which originally meant 120.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  33. Newton invented/discovered calculus in about the same amount of time the average student learns it.
    ♦ SOURCE
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