1. 1 billion people speak English. That's 1 in every 7 on earth.
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  2. 80% of information stored on all computers in the world is in English.
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  3. English words "I", "we", "two" and "three" are among
    the most ancient, from thousands of years.
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  4. The longest
    common English word
    without vowels
    is "rhythms".
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  5. A new word in English is created every 98 minutes.
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  6. 89%
    of people in Sweden speak English.
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  7. The word "bride" comes from an old proto-germanic word meaning "to cook".
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  8. The word "queue" is pronounced the same way when the last 4 letters are removed.
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  9. The word "mortgage" comes from a French word that means "death contract".
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  10. The concept behind the word "cool" might come from the African word "itutu", brought to America by slavery.
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  11. 90% of everything written in English uses just 1,000 words.
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  12. "Time"
    is the most
    commonly used noun
    in English.
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  13. There are more English words beginning with the letter "s" than with any other letter.
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  14. Nigeria has
    more English speakers than the United Kingdom.
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  15. Screeched
    is the longest English word with one syllable.
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  16. There are 24 different dialects of English in the US.
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  17. Until the 19th century, the English word for actors was "hypocrites."
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  18. The shortest
    complete sentence in
    the English language
    is "Go".
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  19. Phrases in English such as "long time no see", "no go", and "no can do" come from literal translations of Chinese phrases.
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  20. "LOL" was formally recognized in 2011's update of the Oxford English Dictionary.
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  21. "IRONIC"
    is the most commonly
    misused word in English
    says Dictionary.com.
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  22. The day
    after tomorrow
    is called
    "Overmorrow."
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  23. Today's British accent first appeared among London's upper class around the time of the American Revolution. Before that, the British accent was similar to that of Americans.
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  24. 80%
    of all written paragraphs in English feature the word "the."
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  25. Bald Eagles are so named because "balde" is an Old English word meaning "white."
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  26. Harry Potter books were translated from British to American English.
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  27. The verb "unfriend" dates back to 1659. It existed even earlier as a noun, as far back as 1275.
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  28. Understanding English actually hurts professional players of English scrabble. Some of the world's best Scrabble players are Thai and can't speak English.
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  29. The words 'idiot,' 'imbecile,' and 'moron' were originally medical categories for intellectual disability.
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  30. Dr. Seuss was the first to publish the word "nerd."
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  31. The phrase ‘Time Person of the Year' contains the first, second and third most commonly used nouns in English, in order.
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  32. "Hello" didn't become a greeting until the telephone arrived.
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  33. "Dreamt" and its derivatives are the only common English words that end in "mt."
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  34. Only one word in all of English has an X, Y, and Z in order: "Hydroxyzine."
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  35. The only English word with three "Y" is "syzygy," which happens to describe the alignment of 3 celestial bodies in a straight line.
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  36. The word "OK" originated in 1839 when a newspaper used it as a funny abbreviation of "oll korrect."
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  37. The English word "Callipygian" means having a beautiful ass.
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  38. The sole term in English to begin with "tm" is "Tmesis," the insertion of words between a compound phrase, as in "what-so-ever" inserted in the middle of "whatever."
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  39. Muscle comes from the Latin musculus, which means "little mouse," because a flexed muscle was thought to resemble a mouse.
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  40. "Police police Police police police police Police police." is a valid sentence, since "police" is both a noun and a verb.
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  41. By the age of 20, a native English-speaking American knows 42,000 dictionary words.
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  42. The chemical name for titin, the world's largest known protein, is 189,819 letters long.
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  43. The word ambisinistrous is the opposite of ambidextrous; it means ‘no good with either hand'.
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  44. ‘Bitch the pot' was 19th-century slang for ‘pour the tea'.
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  45. "Rhinorrhea" is the medical condition otherwise known as a "runny nose."
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  46. The word "rooster" was favored in the U.S. as a puritan alternative to "cock" after it had acquired the secondary sense "penis."
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  47. Noah Webster learned 26 languages, including Anglo-Saxon and Sanskrit, in the process of writing "An American Dictionary of the English Language."
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  48. Charles Boycott, an English land agent, was so hated by the community he became a verb.
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  49. "Goodbye" is a contraction of "God be with ye."
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  50. The phrase 'crocodile tears' refers to a medieval belief that crocodiles shed tears of sadness when killing and consuming their prey.
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  51. September is the ninth month and the only month with the same number of letters in its name in English as the number of the month.
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  52. Horse-eating is called Hippophagy.
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  53. 'Flabbergasted' was first recorded in a 1772 list of new words alongside 'bored'.
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  54. The names of the English rivers Avon, Axe, Esk, Exe and Ouse all mean ‘river' or ‘water' in various ancient languages.
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  55. The average active vocabulary of an adult English speaker is of around 20,000 words.
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  56. The term "Hippie" is derived from the term "Hipster," which described jazz fans in the 1940's. Hipsters were known for pot smoking and sarcasm.
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  57. The word "Britain" is derived from "Pretain" meaning "painted", originally because the Britons had tattoos.
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  58. The term "sniper" comes from how hard it is to shoot the snipe bird.
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  59. Jesus' name translated from Hebrew to English would be 'Joshua'. We get the name 'Jesus' by translating the Hebrew name to Greek to Latin to English.
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  60. Yawning and stretching at the same time is called "pandiculating."
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  61. The 1989 article that proposed the acronym LOL also suggested using ‘H' to mean ‘Huh?'
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  62. The word "profane" comes from the Latin "profanus," meaning "outside the temple".
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  63. The old word for a kiss on the hand is "baisemain."
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  64. The word "quickie", which has sexual connotations today, began as a 1920s term for a film produced over the course of a mere two weeks.
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  65. The word "cleavage" comes from geology. It refers to a separation between rocks or crystals. American movie censors adopted the term as a euphemism in 1940s.
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  66. "Mouse potato" is someone who spends a lot of time at a computer.
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  67. There's a synonym
    for the word
    synonym
    it's poecilonym.
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  68. "Kentish Fire" is a prolonged clapping by an audience, especially in unison, indicating impatience or disapproval.
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  69. Data scientists analyzed 10,222 words to discover the "happiest" word in the English language. It's "laughter."
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  70. Wasp used to be "waps," while bird used to be "brid" and horse used to be "hros." Pronunciation errors made the English language what it is today.
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  71. English has 3,000 words for being drunk.
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  72. The term “checkmate” comes from the Arabic and ultimately Persian phrase “shah mat” which means “the king is dead.”
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  73. ‘Cheesy' originally meant ‘excellent'.
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  74. A "flibbertigibbet" is a frivolous and flighty person who is excessively talkative.
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  75. The word "White" comes from the Indo-European root kweit meaning "to shine."
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  76. "Euouae" is the longest word in the English language which is made up of nothing but vowels.
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  77. "Whatever" is the most annoying word, a U.S. poll found in 2016 for the eight year in a row.
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  78. The average English-speaker has about 50,000 words in their mind and finds the right one in 600 milliseconds.
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  79. "Bird" was originally spelled "brid."
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  80. The word ‘hundred' derives from ‘hundra' in Old Norse, which originally meant 120.
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  81. ‘Bumpsy' is 17th-century slang for ‘drunk'.
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  82. 770,000 people living in England cannot speak English well.
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  83. Latin had about 800 obscene words; English has only about 20.
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Updated on 2019-11-26
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