1. Hiroshima and Nagasaki are not radioactive anymore mostly because the bombs didn't touch the ground but were detonated in the air.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  2. A Japanese man survived both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings during WW2.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  3. A survivor of Hiroshima's atomic bombing went to Boston in 1951 and won the Marathon.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  4. Fat Man
    was the codename for the atomic bomb that was detonated over Nagasaki.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  5. Kokura, Japan, was the original target of the atomic bomb that landed in Nagasaki.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  6. A Bonsai Tree planted in 1626 survived the atomic bomb at Hiroshima and now resides in a U.S. Museum.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  7. A month after the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima, a typhoon hit the city killing another 2,000 people.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  8. 10% of US electricity is made from dismantled atomic bombs.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  9. In 1962, the U.S. blew up a hydrogen bomb in space that was 100 times more powerful than Hiroshima.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  10. Atomic bomb tests were a major tourist attraction in Las Vegas during the 1950s.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  11. During the Cold War, the U.S. seriously considered dropping an atomic bomb on the Moon to show off its military superiority.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  12. The atomic bomb explosion at Hiroshima was generated by matter weighing no more than a paper clip.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  13. Russia has over 8400 nuclear weapons, more than any other country.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  14. There'’s a nuclear bomb lost somewhere off the coast of Georgia.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  15. Robert Oppenheimer, "the father of the atomic bomb," tried to kill his university tutor with a poisoned apple.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  16. CT body scans expose the patient to the same amount of radiation as that experienced within a mile and a half of the Hiroshima atomic bomb.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  17. There's an atomic bomb museum in New Mexico, where the first atomic bomb was detonated. The museum is only open 12 hours per year.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  18. Barack Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, 71 years after the atomic bomb.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  19. At least a dozen Americans were killed by the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, a fact that the U.S. did not acknowledge until the 1970s.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  20. During the Cold War the United States military misplaced at least 8 nuclear weapons permanently.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  21. In the 1950s, Las Vegas crowned a Miss Atomic Bomb.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  22. Although he was a devoted pacifist, Einstein wrote a letter to President Roosevelt, urging him to prioritize the development of an atomic weapon before Nazi Germany.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  23. According to a Pew study, 56% of Americans think the use of atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 was justified, down from 63% in 1991.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  24. The largest nuclear bomb ever detonated, the Tsar Bomba, was 1,400 times more powerful than Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  25. The temperatures near the site of the bomb blast during the Hiroshima explosion were estimated to be 300,000°Celsius (540,000°Fahrenheit). That's 300 times hotter than the temperature bodies are cremated at.
    ♦ SOURCE
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  26. More than 2,400 nuclear bombs have been detonated since 1945.
    ♦ SOURCE
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Updated on 2017-10-12
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